Archive

Tag Archives: Art Exhibition

Elín Hansdóttir
SUSPENSION OF DISBELIEF

KW Institute for Contemporary Art
KUNST-WERKE BERLIN e.V.

Auguststraße 69
D-10117 Berlin

15. 3.– 25. 5. 15
Exhibition / 1+2
Opening: Saturday, 14.3.15, 17–22 h

For SUSPENSION OF DISBELIEF Elín Hansdóttir produces a site-specific work, which uses the architecture of the former margarine factory as a starting point for a spatial and filmic installation.

Hansdóttir places the viewers in the spotlight of her cross-genre installations. Over the past years, her artistic practice has shifted from sculptural concepts to dynamic spatial arrangements, which incorporate sound and light, but also address the changes in the viewers’ perception through their own movements as essential elements. SUSPENSION OF DISBELIEF is the first work by Hansdóttir in which the filmic experiment plays a key role. Employing acoustic and optical effects as well as architectural elements, her works explore the potentials and limitations of spatial experience.

SUSPENSION OF DISBELIEF is funded by Medienboard Berlin Brandenburg. With additional support from the Icelandic Visual Arts Fund, the Icelandic Art Center, the Embassy of Iceland, and the Muggur Travel Grant.

Elín Hansdóttir, SUSPENSION OF DISBELIEF, 2014, Working model, detail, Courtesy Elín Hansdóttir and i8 Gallery, Reykjavik

affiche_itwasalla

I am never really that satisfied with presenting a photograph, as is, maybe because I do not consider myself a photographer or possibly the medium itself feels detached when solely presented.  Seeing Thierry Furgers’ work exhibited in “It was all a Dream” was simple yet effective in bringing the site and location to the image.  I guess for me the images had a feel rather than just being processed.  The photographs became objects and tactile, for me this causes a sense of urgency to engage more with the works.  Like I say simple method but used to great effect.

Here are some images of “It was all a Dream”. Further work and information is available here: http://www.buffedpaintings.com/ and http://www.thierryfurger.ch

paperroom_2 plakat_ecke2

affiche_timeisstill chaosroom affiche_zoll affiche_paperoom affiche_schiebetuer r44_4

affiche_bogen_e
affiche_minis_2

paperroom_3

paperroom_1

medoroom  kleineplakate

backstrom

Re:post from Hyperallergic, written by Thomas Micchelli on August 16, 2014

The exhibition takes its title from a poem by Susan Howe, and its subject is aphasia, described in the gallery’s press release as “a cognitive disorder causing an inability to understand or produce speech.” The curatorial intention, drawing on concepts developed by the Russian-American linguist and scholar Roman Jakobson, is to present aphasia “as a cypher with metaphoric and metonymic implications.”

An intriguing concept: how to create an art exhibition about the inability to communicate? That is what curator Rachel Valinsky has set out to do in Itself Not So, the current group show at Lisa Cooley on the Lower East Side, and for the most part, her selections neatly vault past the inherent paradox of the proposition.

Typically (though not necessarily) caused by a stroke, aphasia ranges in severity from an inability to find the correct words for things to the complete loss of the capacity to use or comprehend language, whether spoken, written or signed. At the same time, it does not interfere with the patient’s mental faculties, which only increases the frustration of those suffering from the disorder.

dean

The exhibition, according to the gallery statement, has assembled a selection of artworks that “taken together, form a polyphonic response to the fundamental rupture between thought and expression that aphasia engenders.”

The metaphoric implications of aphasia’s “fundamental rupture between thought and expression” can be readily applied to the creative process, where the rupture between subject and form, idea and object, can often feel unbridgeable — and yet the connection must be made if the artwork is to hold together. And so how does one develop such a concept in the context of an exhibition? The curator’s answer is evidently to present works in which deliberate omissions and obfuscations are major components, as if they are confronting us with their own unmaking.

This idea is at its most conspicuous in a work like Michael Dean’s “Analogue Series (tongue) On the pronunciation of the letter L” (2014), which features a straight-back chair with a black (aphasic?) tongue in the place of one of its four legs, rendering it unusable. In a piece by Ryan Gander, which bears the impossibly long title, “Associative Template # 23 – (And all that chatter around your career) *Debit and Credit by Dan Fox, first published in Frieze, Issue 119, Nov-Dec 2008” (2009), aphasia’s gaps in comprehension are suggested by the holes left in a large, handprinted photograph from which sizable sections have been laser-cut and placed on the floor beneath it.

gander

The sensation of halting, unclear thoughts is visualized to striking effect in Fia Backström’s “An-alpha/pet-isms…” (2014), an installation consisting of sheets of clear vinyl film hanging from five standing steel frames, upon which letters of the alphabet float like obscured, distorted ghosts amid inky clouds, blurs and blots.

And there is “I Hate” (2007), a hi-def video by Imogen Stidworthy that focuses on a middle-aged man, presumably afflicted with aphasia, and his attempts to try and speak. All of these works walk the tightrope between clarity and unintelligibility in ways that are by turns visceral, heady, sensuous and whimsical.

The reason behind including some of the other works in the show is not as clear-cut, but that makes them no less engaging. There’s artist/musician Ben Vida’s “Slipping Control (pink/green/blue)” (2013-2014), an elegantly designed triptych comprised of three framed digital prints employing patterns of letters laid out in the spaces between pink, green and blue rectangles. The work is the basis for a vocal piece performed by the artist, whose repetitive, percussive soundings could be likened to aphasic stammering, but without the loss of control experienced by the patient.

vida

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rick Myers’s “Either side of the eye” (2010) offers two steel squares covered in lubricating flake graphite, one featuring a concave depression and the other with a matching convex protrusion. A quick glance can fool the eye as to which is which, but such visual ambiguity doesn’t seem to touch on the communicational handicaps stemming from the disorder.

Another work by Myers, “Study with BEFORE following AFTER” (2010), more successfully conveys the idea of expression held captive. The piece couldn’t be simpler — five black, vertical bands running the length of a narrow sheet of paper — but there is something compellingly dense, even layered about it. It is tempting to think that this impression is related to the work’s materials and process, which are described on the checklist as “Alcohol sealed sooted paper with etched soundwaves of the words AFTER, BEFORE, AFTER, having been spoken aloud and transcribed using a phonautograph.”

There are two other abstractions in the show, both by James Hoff, though they look like the work of two different artists. “Concept Virus #1” (2013), in enamel on aluminum, looks like hyper-pixelated video snow, while “Stuxnet No. 5” (2014), a red, white, blue and black Chromalux transfer on aluminum, is a Gerhard Richter-like smear of color. Neither seems to fit under the exhibition’s umbrella, which is also true of a conceptual piece by Julien Bismuth called “A train of thought” (2011), consisting of four sticks painted different colors on each of their four sides. In the notes for this work we are told, “The sticks are rotated daily so as to go through all 24 permutations of the four-color sequence.” Perhaps the piece’s daily evolution is meant to correspond with the slow, frustrating grind of rehabilitative therapy?

stidworthy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

According to its wall text, another conceptual work, Research Services’ “If You’re Phone Doesn’t Ring, It’s Me” (2014), takes the subject of aphasia “as a social phenomenon triangulated by politics, aesthetics, and technology.” The artists, soliciting phone numbers from the viewing public, plan to interview participants via “robotic avatars” and broadcast the conversations in the gallery.

The exhibition’s remaining pieces, all text-based, perhaps have the most tenuous connection to aphasia, but they point in some interesting directions. Sophia Le Fraga’s video, “W8ING” (2014), consists of scrolling cellphone text messages chockablock with abbreviations and emoticons — which, in their disuse of language, may or may not be signs of aphasia. “W8ING” is supposedly a riff on Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot, at least according to Karen Rosenberg’s review in yesterday’s New York Times, but the triteness of the dialogue makes the connection murky at best. (Le Fraga’s other video, “TH3 B4LD 5OPRANO; or, English Made Easy,” 2014, apparently applies the same treatment to Eugène Ionesco, but the piece was not available the afternoon I visited the gallery.)

Both Sue Tompkins and Christopher Knowles use typewriters to create their works. Tompkins’ handsome, 18-part “The Lost Weekend” (2014) runs in a horizontal line across two sides of a corner of the room. Incorporating typewritten designs and enigmatic phrases on letter-size sheets of newsprint, the piece’s mystery-shrouded words could be considered stand-ins for the confusion over precise meanings that aphasia can cause.

saroyan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Knowles, who received a diagnosis of autism when he was a child and came into prominence at the age of 17 when his poetry was included in the libretto for Philip Glass’s Einstein on the Beach(1976), has contributed two of his pattern-based, black-and-red typewriter pieces, “Designs” and “Butterfly Blocks,” both from the 1980s. At the top of “Designs,” he has repeated the words “black” and “red” in their corresponding colors. The self-evident meaning of those marks, which soon give way to complex streams and patterns of a single letter — the lowercase “c” — embodies a poignant literalism in search of human connection. There is no abstraction, no chance of a mistake: red is red and black is black, a simple truth that marks the first step in the stairwell toward a sense of surety and understanding.

The poets Susan Howe and Aram Saroyan employ their own poetry as works of art in very different, very potent ways. Howe uses another obsolete technology, letterpress, to create drifting, squeezed and fragmented shapes out of excerpts from her poems; we don’t know what to respond to first, the elegance of the designs or the music of the words (some of which are illegible). But this is an instance of neither/nor — the physical beauty of the objects creates a doubled meaning, with each element dependent upon and inseparable from the other.

Aram Saroyan, a pioneer of Minimalist poetry, is showing “Lighght” (1989), the yellow-on-white silkscreen he made from his famous (or, for some, notorious) one-word poem, “lighght,” which was first published in 1965. Like the orders of significance in the pieces by Knowles and Howe, the image in Saroyan’s print is suspended between, and compounded by, what constitutes a word and the indefinable visual resonances carried by its semiotic representation. These poets, rather than falling into the rupture between thought and expression, bring to their visual works an understanding of the limits of language and the tools — from the metrical to the symbolic to the typographic — needed to traverse them. To make art out of their poems is just another step along the continuum.

Itself Not So continues at Lisa Cooley (107 Norfolk Street, Lower East Side, Manhattan) through August 29.

Re-post from This Is Tomorrow.

1_ausstellungsansicht_neue-wege-nichts-zu-tun_kunsthalle-wien-2014_1

The Hidden Passengers

‘From the press release’

Productivity and growth are the philosophical premises of the present day. Working processes are being optimized to increase efficiency, working hours are being deregulated until the distinction between work and leisure time disappears. Artistic work seems to follow other criteria, but in this field too professionalisation and self-optimisation are on the rise. But what would happen if ‘doing nothing’ or ‘inaction’ were to become a source of inspiration for a refusal to produce.

New Ways of Doing Nothing devotes itself to a form of artistic production that opposes activity, doing and manufacturing, and instead gives an affirmative slant to forms of doing nothing, of refraining or asceticism. Here, refraining from something not only leads to a critical moment but also a creative one. New Ways of Doing Nothing – the title derives from Swedish artist Karl Holmqvist – focuses on positions in contemporary art in which ‘doing nothing’ generates its own potential with respect to the requirements (and impositions) of a society that concentrates on activity and productivity: for example in Natalie Czech’s variation on a diary entry by the Russian avant-garde poet Daniil Charms, who in 1937 noted: “Today I Wrote Nothing. Doesn’t Matter.”

Artists: Robert Breer, Alejandro Cesarco, Etienne Chambaud, Natalie Czech, Oskar Dawicki, Edith Dekyndt, Mathias Delplanque, Heinrich Dunst, Gardar Eide Einarsson, Marina Faust, Claire Fontaine, Ryan Gander, Lasse Schmidt, Hansen, Julia Hohenwarter, Karl Holmqvist, Sofia Hultén, Jiri Kovanda, Rivane Neuenschwander, George Perec/Bernard Queysanne, Superflex, Mario Garcia, Torres a. o.

6_claire-fontaine_bartelby_le_scribe__large

2_ausstellungsansicht_neue-wege-nichts-zu-tun_kunsthalle-wien-2014__large 4_ausstellungsansicht_neue-wege-nichts-zu-tun_kunsthalle-wien-2014__large

5_etienne-chambaud_disclaimer__large


NewhavenA3poster01_text

NEWHAVEN STATION

‘A site for new art works and a new use of space’

Open Install Afternoon: Tuesday 12th March 2013, 12–5pm

Preview: Friday 22nd March 2013, 7–9pm

Exhibition: Saturday 23rd March–Friday 29th 2013

Newhaven Station, 85 Craighall Road, “Bridge No. 12”, Edinburgh, EH6

Newhaven Station is an explorative exhibition into the transformation of space by three Edinburgh-based artists, responding to the North Edinburgh site with new video, sculpture and wall-mounted works.

Richard Taylor, Dickie Webb and Claudia de la Peña, all artists who have previously worked on separate projects, come to together for the first time with works investigating Newhaven Station’s current stasis.

Since its discontinued use as a railway station in 1962 the building has evolved from a carpentry workshop into an abandoned space ripe for development. In its present reality Richard Arnot, the owner of Newhaven Station, has gifted the artist’s use of the station as it nears a final transformation into freelance office space.

The artists will respond to this flux in the station’s use, peeling away layers of history and community, to decipher new avenues in their individual practices and discover journeys as a collective group. Richard Arnot, “As a resident of North Edinburgh I felt this would be an interesting project to support. It’s great to be able to provide much needed space for Richard, Dickie and Claudia, and to see how Newhaven Station might continue to contribute to a steadily expanding cultural scene in the north of the city.”

Holly Knox Yeoman, the exhibition organiser, first realised the potential for the space during Doors Open Day Edinburgh 2012 and has since been working to coordinate an exhibition of artists’ work. Yeoman adds “I grew up round the corner from the building and was always intrigued by its destitute structure. Through Doors Open Day and meeting Richard Arnot, it was fantastic to see the building returning somewhere closer to its former glory. The site-responsive works produced between the artists will hopefully create a welcoming invitation to local people, furthering dialogue surrounding the nature of the building as a forgotten landmark.”

Open Install

On Tuesday 12th March, the doors of Newhaven Station will be open, welcoming people in to the space to meet the artists and enquire into the process in which they are working to create their works and exhibition. Independent curator and writer Kate Grenyer will also be present, observing the creative interactions between the artists, initiating critical discourse beyond the exhibition.

For further information please email – hollyknoxyeoman@hotmail.co.uk

Artist Biographies

Richard Taylor

Richard has produced a new set of work including free standing and hanging sculptures, wall mounted drawings and objects, and floor-based dioramas. Each work will reference the other through a ‘mini-game’ status. ‘Mini-game’ is a deliberate positioning of a certain lost character that finds itself during sessions put aside in the studio. In order to address this status the works, as they are visited and re-visited over a period of time, may look unfinished in their overworked state, require closer inspection and participation, or will only reach completion through site-specific response.

Richard Taylor (b. 1985, Sheffield), a 2007 graduate from Leeds University, is an artist and writer based in Edinburgh. The roots of his ideas start as short stories or small pencil drawings that depict intentions or actions addressing ulterior characterisation or modes of production. Recent projects have seen ideas develop into collaborations, performances, installations and published works. In 2012 Richard exhibited with The Mutual and artist Jennifer Picken at GI 2012; undertook a residency at AWA Gallery in Amsterdam; performed at [STATE] of Uncertainty in Birmingham; and showed work at an open studio event in Chelva, Spain.

Dickie Webb

Dickie’s site responsive approach to Newhaven Station will parallel the building’s transitory state and renovation, creating a heterotopic environment that appears distanced from the here and now.  As considered material choices echo the surroundings, additional frameworks and scaffolds – displaying metaphorical forms, images and panels – will allow the viewer’s imagination to project an experience that is greater than the station’s architecture, transporting them to a place with uncertain boundaries.

Dickie Webb (b. 1979, Oxford) is currently in his final year of Intermedia Art at Edinburgh College of Art and splits his time between New Zealand and the UK. This nomadic life stimulates considerations within present work, questioning our changing relationship with disremembered spaces. Recent projects have included subtle object abstractions using processed materials to create sculptures that sit somewhere between the familiar and imaginary.  He has exhibited work at The Kitchen Gallery, Clermont College, Batavia, Ohio, USA and at The Demarco European Art Foundation, Edinburgh.

Claudia de la Peña

Claudia will create new sculptural pieces that react to the pictorial potential of Newhaven Station. Through a series of site-specific gestures, she considers the symmetry of a more personal artistic intervention alongside the broader re-engagement of this previously disused, yet historically rich, space. This positive renewal is pertinent to her sympathies towards the recycling of found materials, both in function and substance.

Claudia de la Peña (b. 1988, Edinburgh), a 2011 graduate of Fine Art from Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, is a cross disciplinary artist currently based in Edinburgh. At its core, her work is an investigative tool to create and understand meaningful dialogues between materials, both in physical and symbolic realms. Her practice is often site specific using found, made and raw materials punctuated with photographic elements.

newhaven1