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Matt Calderwood – Interrupted Projections sees 3D and 2D meet with direct prints taken from 3D and presented in 2D.  A simple yet effective translation which creates a dialogue between the two dimensions.  It is however the decisions and errors in this translation that intrigue me, like with a lot of visual attraction its the flaws that have the detail and interest.  This exhibition for me portrays this in a straight up fashion, with such simplicity leading to so much more.  The 2D prints deliver new narratives and readings of what came before.
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Matt Calderwood
Interrupted Projections

opening Saturday 1 March 2014, 6–9 pm
exhibition 2 March – 12 April 2014
Wednesday–Saturday 11 am – 6 pm and by appointment

Sommer & Kohl are pleased to present the first solo exhibition of new works by British artist Matt Calderwood (*1975 Northern Ireland).

The title of the exhibition Interrupted Projections refers to mapmaking processes which translate the curved, three-dimensional terrestrial surface onto a flat, two-dimensional plane. No map projection can preserve shape and size simultaneously, and the larger the mapped area, the more pronounced the total distortion. Interrupted maps were developed in order to represent specific map characteristics more accurately or to achieve the best possible compromise for certain sections of a map.

Calderwood is interested in the fact that compromises are necessary when transferring a three-dimensional surface onto a two-dimensional plane. Where does the space between a sculpture and its flat representation get lost? Recently the artist has been producing printed images from a range of rubber and plywood sculptures using printers ink and household gloss paint on large sheets of paper. These works have always recorded one side of the sculpture resulting in something like a drawing of the object.

For Interrupted Projections, Matt Calderwood deals with the object’s entire surface. His central theme, how to follow the logic of objects with an economy of means, is always present in the background. For the exhibition, the raw plywood form is painted on all sides with gloss paint, placed onto a tyvek sheet and wrapped on all sides with the material. After a few moments the now gloss printed wrapping is removed and both it and the sculpture are left to dry. This process is repeated several times. The sculpture hereby becomes subject, tool and object for the image production.  At the same time the images resulting from this process are like a set of maps for the sculpture. Like a cartographer’s interrupted projection where there are cuts in the image to allow the flattening of the globe’s surface with minimal distortion, the necessary folds in the fabric as it negotiates the three-dimensional surface create similar interruptions and compromises within the prints.

Matt Calderwood lives and works in London. 2013 he had solo exhibitions at the De La Warr Pavilion in Bexhill On Sea (UK) and at Baltic 39 in Newcastle upon Tyne (UK).

For further information and/or images please contact Sommer & Kohl.

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I am drawn to the works by Pablo Valbuena by the way he allows the viewer to straddle both the real and virtual/digital realms.  His subtle carefully placed interventions are eloquent and respond to the existing patterns of the architecture whilst break and ask the the viewer to build understanding through their own experiences.

Here is the article written on the Creative Application website:

Created by Pablo Valbuena, Time Tilings are four site-specific interventions created for Artefact festival, STUK Kunstencentrum. Leuven, BE in 2013. Like in most of his projects, time tilings is about time, space and perception. He explores the overlap of the physical and the virtual, the generation of mental spaces by the observer, the dissolution of the boundaries between real and perceived, the links between space and time and the use of light as prime matter.

Time Tilings includes projection mapping onto existing surfaces that are physical patterns in themselves. The projections add a new dimension of time where the projected geometries are carefully and precisely mapped over the physical ones. The installation is site-specific each time, formulated as a direct response to the perceptual qualities, physical conditions and surrounding influences of a certain location or space.

Architecture is judged by eyes that see, by the head that turns, and the legs that walk. Architecture is not a synchronic phenomenon but a successive one, made up of pictures adding themselves one to the other, following each other in time and space, like music. — Le Corbusier. Modulor I.

Project Page | Pablo Valbuena

See also quadratura and para-site [mattress factory]

Pablo is a visual artist with an architectural background. Born in Spain and currently based in the south of France (Toulouse), his work has been presented internationally in public and private institutions, biennials and galleries as exhibitions and site-specific commissions. He has developed large-scale interventions in the public space in locations across Europe and America.

 

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re:post from http://we-make-money-not-art.com/archives/2013/07/thermal.php

Written by Regine on July 26, 2013

One last project exhibited a few weeks ago at the Sight + Sound festival in Montreal. You might remember that a while ago I interviewed Arthur Heist about the workshopAnalyze Dat: TOR Visualization & online black markets. Before that, i talked with Nicolas Maigret about The Pirate Cinema.

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Organic polymers

This time, i had an exchange of emails with Mario De Vega to talk about Thermal, a performance in which he uses microwave ovens to alter the molecular composition of different materials. The work also uses custom-built hardware to sonify the electromagnetic activity produced by the overheating of the content of the ovens.

Hi Mario! Thermal is an audio-visual performance in which several objects are modified using a microwave oven. Now I’m sure you’ve been asked that questions many times but isn’t it dangerous to put objects inside a microwave? The photos from the performances look a bit on the hazardous side to me. Do you have to take certain precautions?

I over-expose danger and confront human vulnerability through a frontal situation. Security advices are given before the performance starts and audience are free to leave the room. I give information and advice of possible danger.

Of course, by overheating a device which development comes from radar technology research from WWII, confronts a complex paradigm: the oven could explode during the performance, gases are highly toxic and electromagnetic activity aim to be materialized thorough acoustic pressure.

Thermal is a confrontation with our own vulnerability using an electronic device that mainly everyone can recognize, a device that modified nutritional facts, social interaction and climate. The action has a political content itself without intending being political as principle. It confronts and intimidates through presence, ambiguity, over-exposed information and acoustic pressure. It also has a visual aim. I’m interested in how electronic devices or arrangements suggest context through ambiguity, in other words, I’m interested in producing events and situations in which codes are visible but not completely “readable”. We could be able, in this case, to recognize an object (microwave oven) but our understanding of things reduce our approach, resulting in a situation with dislocated semantic structure in which things are there, frontal and visible and more over we can not understand what is happening.

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During the performance, you put materials such as wax, ceramic, magnesium, carboxylic acid, pvc, etc. inside the microwaves. Could you describe how some of them react? Did any of the material you used react in a way you did not expect?

This has mainly a sculptural mean; with Thermal I’m interested in research materialization, irritation and modification as main topics. I modify materials, amplify, expose the process and materialize the results through different outputs. Technically, by irritating the molecular composition of matter, microwaves reflection change by absorption. We can think this in terms that certain materials absorb more than others, and here absorbing means less reflection and less dynamic range in an audio event.
We can understand amplification through four semantic layers.

The first one has the aim to amplify electromagnetic activity, high frequency mainly into the 2.4 GHz range. For this I use SNUFF and LIMEN, electronic devices based on logarithmic detectors used to demodulate high spectrum electromagnetic signals into a human audible ranges.

The second later is luminal activity. Using mainly a custom amplifier (BABEL) to convert lumens into sound.

The third part is electro-mechanic, using mainly a contact microphone to amplify friction and mechanic activity produced by the oven, rotating plate movements, for example.
The forth and last is probably the most dynamic part, reduced in a switch. On / Off. I turn on and off the device in order to maintain tension and produce a dynamic event.

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Window of the microwave oven during performance

More generally, could you describe what is going on during the performance? What can the audience see, smell and hear?

What you hear is mainly activity that in a normal situation humans would not be able to codify as acoustic pressure. I use electronic media to demodulate, amplify and over expose highly toxic electromagnetic pollution produced by an electro-domestic device used by 40% of the population worldwide. Burnt plastic and overheated corrosive materials are toxic; smell is an important issue for Thermal.

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Moscow Biennale, Moscow, 2009

If I understood correctly, the main instrument for this audio-visual performance is the microwave oven. Did you have to modify the household appliance for the work?

No, the ovens are not modified. This would be a very complex and even dangerous task. For me it’s even more interesting to use the devices as they are, I just simply amplify its activity.

Any upcoming project, event or research field you’d like to share with us?

Probably I should then here expose deeply my apologizes to delay this interview so long. I’ve been working in a solo exhibition in Mexico City during the last two years (SIN); the opening was on the 20th of June in a Museum located downtown namedLaboratorio Arte Alameda. It’s composed by 6 site-interventions, curated by Carsten Seiffarth and a retrospective salon curated by Michel Blancsubé.

An upcoming publication compiling 10 years of my work will be published this month, and an editorial project about thermal must be finished this year, as well as a vinyl edition with artkillart.

Thanks Mario!

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If you’re curious about Mario’s work, head to Berlin Art Link, they recently visited the artist’s studio.

Other works exhibited at Sight and Sound, a festival produced by Eastern Bloc in Montreal: Analyze Dat: TOR Visualization & online black markets and The Pirate Cinema, A Cinematic Collage Generated by P2P Users.

Photo on the homepage: © Kimberley Bianca / transmediale. All other images courtesy of the artist.

 

Morton Subotnick’s Silver Apples of the Moon: ‘It blew my mind!’

Fifty years ago, Morton Subotnick inadvertently invented techno with his ‘electronic music box’, the Buchla synthesiser. Now, he’s revisiting the piece for the Adelaide festival.
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‘I wasn’t on drugs when I make it’ … Morton Subotnick with a re-creation of the Buckla synth.

In 1967, the American composer Morton Subotnick released a record called Silver Apples of the Moon. It was the first electronic album ever to be commissioned by a classical record label, and it is still revered among synth gurus for containing the seeds – or possibly the pips – of techno.

Now 80 years old, though looking at least 20 years younger, Subotnick has flown halfway round the world, from his home in New York to Australia, to perform Silver Apples of the Moon in its entirety at theAdelaide festival. But what he’s really excited about is a new app he has created that enables kids to create their own electronic compositions on an iPad.

The app – called Pitch Painter – could be seen as the fulfilment of Subotnick’s prophecy, made in the 1960s, that one day every living room would contain a synthesiser. Having downloaded the app, I’m eager to play him the jaunty little electro-nursery rhyme I’ve come up with. “That’s very good,” he says. “A three-year-old could have done it,” I reply.

“That’s exactly the point. It’s a way of enabling kids to create music intuitively, without standard notation getting in the way. You wouldn’t prevent children from expressing themselves in paint before they’ve learned to draw, so why shouldn’t they be able to compose without reading music?”

Subotnick himself studied music at Mills College in Oakland, California, where his fellow students included future minimalists Terry Riley andSteve Reich. He was all set for a career as a clarinettist, but his interest in electro-acoustic music led to the establishment of the San Francisco Tape Music Centre in 1961, with fellow musician Ramon Sender. The two men dreamed of creating compositions with sounds no conventional acoustic instrument could produce. So, with a $500 grant from the Rockefeller Foundation, Subotnick commissioned electronics wizard Don Buchla to build an “electronic music box”.

For his performance of Silver Apples of the Moon, Subotnick will be using a modern re-creation of the first Buchla synthesiser (the original is now in the Library of Congress). It looks more like a miniature telephone exchange than an instrument, which may explain why it never really caught on. Shortly after it appeared, Robert Moog debuted an alternative that was adopted by the likes of Pete Townshend, Micky Dolenz and Wendy Carlos, whose Switched-On Bach, recorded on a Moog, became one of the biggest-selling classical releases of all time. Not that Subotnick was impressed. “I could never see the point in playing old music on a new invention,” he says. “If I’m going to play Bach, I’d rather use a harpsichord.”

The Buchla might not have caught on, but that didn’t stop Subotnick making full use of it. Almost 50 years on, Silver Apples of the Moon still sounds arrestingly contemporary. The piece is in two parts: the first is slower, moodier and full of profound, synthetic sighs, like a robot in despair; then in the second half, something extraordinary happens – the music suddenly develops a pulse and climaxes in the frenzied hammering of proto-club rhythms.

This had simply never been heard before. Early electronic compositions were mostly about sine waves, oscillations, timbre – all devoid of rhythm, by and large. Yet, says Subotnick, his discovery of beats happened almost by accident. “In the early days, it took a long, long time – sometimes even days – to programme a sequence. Quite unintentionally, I found I had created this pulsating rhythm. I started grooving with it – and it blew my mind.”

And quite a lot of other minds, too. Silver Apples swiftly became an essential psychedelic soundtrack. “I certainly wasn’t on drugs when I made it,” he says. “I was working too hard. But I’d been staging multimedia performances with dance companies using projections and coloured oils since the early 60s, which was several years before psychedelia is supposed to have started.”

Even the album’s trippy title is perhaps a little less trippy than it appears: Subotnick took it from Yeats’s poem The Song of Wandering Aengus: “The silver apples of the moon, the golden apples of the sun.” As Subotnick says, “It doesn’t really mean anything. I just liked the sound of it.”

More innovations followed. Subotnick’s 1994 work All My Hummingbirds Have Alibis was the first interactive concert to be conceived for CD-Rom. And in 1995, he produced the first of his children’s works, Making Music, which might be described as the young person’s guide to the sequencer.

But it’s Silver Apples he will always be most closely associated with – and that suits him fine. “It’s not a bad little piece,” he says. “It’s like a jazz composition. I’ll start out with some of the familiar riffs, then just improvise. It keeps on changing whenever I perform it.”

• Silver Apples of the Moon is at the Adelaide festival on Friday, 7 March. The festival runs until 16 March (adelaidefestival.com.au). Alfred Hickling’s flights were provided by Emirates.

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Whilst in Athens I started to bring together new work that form the basis for Concept Of Since and new project that I am planning on continuing when I head to Japan and on my next artist residency program.  The digital works that I have been developing tends to start thoughts and allows my mind to filter ideas that have been ongoing within my practice.  So this focus on process sometimes produces others works that can be apt and respond to my transient state or present landscape.  The Concept Of Since responds to works that I have been making since returning to art practice about 4/5 years ago.  These works have come full circle and whilst in Athens I realised that I respond to the individual and collective hang ups to events and monuments that have passed.  This reliance on an event, as a crutch to form all future decisions for me seems to hinder and these works that I produced a few years ago around the positivity of change and the potential it can contain relate to these new works that I am currently considering.

Whilst in Athens I was reflecting on my practice throughout and whilst taking notes wrote “things are different now”.  This sentence kept going round my head whilst I was mulling over new ideas and when I came to write it again I wrote “things now are different”.  I then realised that these four words could be presented in any formation and only relied on the person reading it to imply the meaning.  Having spent a lot of time in New Zealand sometimes I end my sentence on an up note.  Which sometimes makes a sentence sound more like a question whilst in the UK this is not the case and the same four words can be read completely different.  Just like how Merleau-Ponty describes space, it has many meanings and it is only how it is phrased/spoken that gives it meaning.

So the two works that formed part of the Unsettled Certainties exhibition were 2 of 24 initial works that form the start of the Concept Of Since.  These works though currently text based will start to move beyond this initial start point and manifest themselves in other mediums as I apply this concept.

A few weeks ago I was a participant on the Sound Tectonics workshops organised by Space Under Magazine in Athens.  Whilst there I was inundated with amazing input from different tutors all coming from various disciplines.  One such tutor Jon Goodbun presented us with a talk about Cybernetics, introducing us to concepts concerning complex systems and feedback loops.  This was my first real taste of these specific concepts and they struck a cord with elements with my art practice and within my work as a snowboard trainer.  Now that I have left Athens where I was on an artist residency run by SNEHTA I am now able to consolidate some of the things I experienced on Sound Tectonics and my time in Athens.  On researching more about Cybernetics its intriguing to realise the areas of science and humanities that it draws on or influences.  Obviously seeing its influence on art movements and artists is a direct concern.  One artist who seems to stand in both the cybernetics field as much as the art world is Roy Ascott.  This image of Roy giving a talk gave me more words and ideas to consider, some resonating instantly and others making me head to Google to find out more.  Just like my time on the Sound Tectonics and now following with this initial research I find myself engaged and enthused with the possibilities of what new perspectives can be learnt.

 

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“Around the Bay” pairs portraits of bayfront nodes with a brief historical profile, focusing on areas that blur the exchange between military and civilian, artificial and natural, industrial and residential, somewhere and nowhere. Matthew Coolidge

I have an ongoing fascination with the works of The Center For Land Use Interpretation (CLUI).  Today I have been reading a few articles and interviews with the Founder and Director Matthew Coolidge.  He has published a new book through CLUI titled:  Around the Bay: Man-Made Sites of Interest in the San Francisco Bay Region.  The interview with Amelia Taylor-Hochberg – Archinect discussed various elements of this book and also Coolidges’ work for CLUI and as lecturer.

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The reason I started reading more was when I came across the class Coolidge use to facilitate at the California College of the Arts in San Francisco.  The class was titled “Nowhere”.  This idea of a class about nowhere actually stopped me for a while.  Thinking about how would you start to discuss nowhere and then in turn realise that is there a nowhere as Coolidge goes onto discuss in one of the articles:

MC: The class was based on the idea that there is no nowhere. We used that kind of terminology for the first part, but it morphed into another kind of class, that perhaps I would have called “somewhere”, if we had to call it something. But it was all so that this idea of “nowhere” doesn’t exist; there is no “away”, you can go away but then you’re there. This notion of “someplace else” is just sort of obsolete, in the same way that the old idea of nature is obsolete. Everything’s been discovered and visited and inhabited and interacted with and is connected to everything else, in a sense of an ecology; interconnected in the broadest sense of the term is also something we think about.

But the class was meant to introduce, to challenge, that idea. Certainly there are the facts and reality situations, then there are our impressions and our beliefs, and those things are often in interesting contrast. I wanted to work with the students in examining a place that wasn’t in their consciousness; that was considered somewhere that they wouldn’t normally go. It was a curatorial practice program in the graduate department. We would go somewhere in southern Louisiana or wherever and experience the sense of being from somewhere else; of going there and trying to make sense of it and establish a place there, an interpretation of it. Each year the class created an impression and an interpretation, in the form of some exhibit or public program, related to the place we visited. And with a very conscious awareness of their view of it, as a type of interpretative mechanism between the viewer and the observer of the object. It was this idea of the subjectivity creating a sense of a place. That is a very subjective and interpretive thing. And in general, objective awareness is something that we’re awfully conscious of with everything we do — the view creates the object, and the medium that presents it modifies it. It’s impossible to really see objectively.

 

To read the rest of this interview please click here.

 

 

Jeremy Deller + Warp records collaborate for Late at Tate Britain

November 13, 2013 Art News No Comments

Jeremy Deller to be joined by Oneohtrix Point Never, Hudson Mohawke and Rustie to soundtrack a series of audio/visual pieces at Tate Britain this December.

Late at Tate Britain and Warp Records are to host an evening of live performances and audio installations which will see producers from the label collaborate alongside Turner Prize winner Jeremy Deller in response to the artist’s iconic 1998 piece The History Of The World.

Taking over Tate Britain’s grand Duveen hall which will use Deller’s bandstand as its focal point, Warp will transform the adjacent galleries into immersive installation spaces. Lots more Info and images over at The Vinyl Factory

Warp x Tate is free to visit on 6th December and will run from 6.30pm til 10pm.
More INfo: warp-x-tate.net

mamco_delphine-reistDelphine Reist, La Chute

The Never Ending Stories cycle, autumn sequence 2013-2014
16 October 2013 to 12 January 2014

MAMCO

Car parks, public lavatories, building sites, basements, government buildings: Delphine Reist’s works are usually located in such thankless, characterless places, devoid of real status and not considered conventional settings for art. Her interventions involve setting ordinary objects in motion: an ever-rolling  barrel, dancing shopping carts, self-starting cars, sporadically swaying curtains… A small, dehumanised theatre in which the spirit of the place is embodied by a revolt of standardised goods.

Now presented at Mamco, La Chute (‘Falling’) involves a similar animation of the commonplace. On entering the Don Judd Loft, visitors will no doubt have a frustrating sense of having got there too late, when it’s all over, and seeing nothing but the remnants, the ruins of a spectacular, violent performance. On the floor is a large piece of ceiling that has just come down, exposing its metal skeleton. Some viewers will be stunned by this seemingly alarming evidence that the building is starting to fall apart. However, more alert eyes may recognise an attempt by the artist to sabotage the authority of the museum, thereby reviving the radicalism of a whole generation of artists who have turned their backs on the whole institution, such as Michael Asher, Hans Haacke or Hans Schabus. And yet the reference stops there, for the damaged ceiling reveals no baleful backgrounds or spectacular bursts of light. Instead, above the ceiling is another ceiling. The thing lying on the ground is simply a piece of lining, stage scenery. It refers to an earlier state of the premises — the Mamco building is a disused factory — as well as to the twilight, romantic vision of its decay. Falling can then be seen as an allegorical  expression of ‘constancy in the laws that govern the world’ — also briefly seen in Reist’s video Averse(‘Downpour’, 2007), in which fluorescent tubes hanging from the ceiling of a multi-purpose room (an office? a classroom?) break away one after the other and shatter on the floor.
This falling also implies a similarity between exhibition spaces and work spaces. Dropped ceilings are part of the architectural vocabulary of offices, but seldom of museums — and this is accentuated by the presence on one of the walls of a row of coat hooks whose shapes are dictated by the combined laws of rationalisation and safety. A changing-room locker with several twitching bags whose undulations recall the briefly brushing bodies normally seen in these cramped spaces. A little further on, another destructive force, another effect of the laws of gravity can be seen in a large wine stain on the wall together with bits of broken bottle, the result and the cause of a movement halfway between a drunken brawl and the polished ritual of a christening. Here we can also detect a nod to some famous avant-garde works — first and foremost Robert Smithson’s Asphalt Rundown(1969). But, in putting her intervention on the scale of a domestic accident, Delphine Reist is again subtly alluding to the museum setting. The form presented here recalls both the opening of an exhibition and the cleaning of the rooms where it takes place. Reist’s ‘falling’ takes us through this shared panoply of movements, objects, situations and furniture — a salutary plunge towards a ‘reality on this side of our threshold of awareness’.

Delphine Reist was born in 1970 and lives in Geneva.
* This English translation has been provided with the support of the J.P. Morgan Private Bank.

Reists’ works seem to use actions, past, present or future to construct or deconstruct spaces, capturing moments for the viewer to reflect on.  If you would like more information on her work please see the Lange + Pult Gallery where she is represented click here.

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Neïl Beloufa is currently showing at François Ghebaly.  His work always fascinates me and hopefully one day I will eventually get to see a show of his in person.  The current exhibition comes with a press release written by Andrew Berardini and is apt for the works that I see being produced by Beloufa.  The press release does what his works do, as though you are double taking or missing a trick.  This engagement brings me back for more and its what makes me like certain works and pass by others.

Here is the release:

Looking everywhere for low-cost, robust quality artwork? Go someplace else.

François Ghebaly isn’t proud to present some of the worst merchandise by Neïl Beloufa. All artwork comes with an “originality” dilemma and so we understand that the lack of originality brings minimal meaning to otherwise invigorating cultural experiences. Keeping that in mind, we can’t offer you a unique solution. This is sub-standard materials and shoddy craftsmanship combined into a truly derivative product.

The product is the problem, the object not worth the effort.

We can pretend of course with half-understood words and derivative ideas. We can write about “critiques of capitalism,” or “the rhetoric of boosterism,” or better “the theatre of consumer desire that penetrates the quotidian, our inner cores.” And if we were feeling exceptionally deceptive, we could insert phrases like “the most significant” or “the leading artist of this generation” and other deplorable superlatives. ███████████████████████████████████████████

Now comes the worst part—while most artworks succeed in their ease of storage, these bulky, unwieldy objects are also difficult to store after use. Beloufa’s work occupies more space while still giving you the least original ideas. While it employs empty gestures and garbled philosophy, it can never be easily dismantled into convenient storage units and impossible to reduce to a single unmuddied brand.

As regards any issues pertaining to repairs and replacements, our services are completely unavailable. As part of our introductory offer, we are asking you to enter a waiting list until you’re allowed to pay.

We want your home to be the cleanest in the neighborhood, so this artwork really isn’t for you. It really doesn’t matter to us!

– Andrew Berardini

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